On THIS DAY IN MUSIC

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MUSIC HISTORY AND MEMORABILIA

 

 

FEBRUARY 


1966 Lou Christie 

Lou Christie went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Lightnin Strikes', a No.11 hit in the UK. Nancy Sinatra held the UK No.1 single position with 'These Boots Are Made For Walkin' 


1965 The Beatles 

Working at Abbey Road studios in London, The Beatles recorded a new John Lennon song 'You're Going To Lose That Girl' in two takes. The track was released on the Help! album. 


1964 The Beatles A British company shipped ½ ton of Beatle wigs to the US. An American reporter later asked John Lennon, "How do you feel about teenagers imitating you with Beatle wigs?" John replied "They're not imitating us because we don't wear Beatle wigs."


1973 Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree" single released by Dawn featuring Tony Orlando (Billboard Song of the Year 1973)


FEBRUARY 13



1961 -   Frank Sinatra 

Frank Sinatra launched his own record label, Reprise Records, in order to allow more artistic freedom for his own recordings. Hence, he garnered the nickname “The Chairman of the Board.”One of the label’s founding principles under Sinatra’s leadership was that each artist would have full creative freedom, and at some point complete ownership of their work. Reprise later became the home of many influential US acts such as Neil Young, Jimi Hendrix, Joni Mitchell, Randy Newman and The Beach Boys


1967 -   The Beatles 

The Beatles released the double A sided single 'Strawberry Fields Forever/Penny Lane' on Capitol Records in the US. The single spent 10 weeks on the chart peaking at No.1. 


1967 -   Monkees 

The Monkees announced that from now on they would be playing on their own recordings instead of session musicians. 


1969 -   Bob Dylan 

Bob Dylan recorded versions of 'Lay, Lady, Lay', at Columbia Recording Studios in Nashville, Tennessee. 'Lay Lady Lay' was originally written for the soundtrack of the movie Midnight Cowboy, but wasn't submitted in time to be included in the finished film. The song has gone on to become a standard and has been covered by numerous bands and artists over the years, including The Byrds, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, The Everly Brothers, Neil Diamond, Melanie, The Isley Brothers, Duran Duran, Hoyt Axton and Isaac Hayes amongst others. 


1969 Paul McCartney A launch party was held for the release of Mary Hopkin's album Postcard at the Post Office Tower in London. Guests included Jimi Hendrix, Donovan and Paul McCartney with his new girlfriend Linda Eastman. 


1970 Black Sabbath On this day, Friday the 13th, Black Sabbath released their debut self-titled studio album on Vertigo records in the UK. Peaking at No.8 on the charts, the album has been recognized as the first main album to be credited with the development of the heavy metal genre. 


1971 The Osmonds started a five week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'One Bad Apple'. The group had been appearing on TV in the US from 1962, on the Andy Williams Show and then the Jerry Lewis show. 

1974 David Bowie David Bowie turned down an offer from the Gay Liberation group to compose 'the world's first Gay National Anthem.' 


1977 Julie Covington  Julie Covington was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Don't Cry For Me Argentina', taken from the Tim Rice & Andrew Lloyd-Webber musical Evita. Covington had been in the 1977 UK TV series based on an all female group called Rock Follies. Madonna had a hit with her version of the song in 1996. 


1978 Dire Straits Dire Straits began recording their first album at Basing Street Studios, London. The whole project cost £12,500 ($21,250) to produce. The album which featured the group's breakthrough single 'Sultans of Swing' went on to enjoy a 132 week run on the UK chart. The inspiration for 'Sultans of Swing' came from Mark Knopfler witnessing a mediocre jazz band playing in the corner of a practically deserted pub. At the end of their performance, the lead singer came up to the microphone and announced that they were the "Sultans of Swing.

FEBRUARY 10

1937-Roberta Flack born, US singer, songwriter, who had the 1972 US No.1 single 'The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face', 1973 US No.1 & UK No.6 single 'Killing Me Softly With His Song'. 


1967- Beatles


The Beatles recorded the orchestral build-up for the middle and end of 'A Day in the Life'. At the Beatles' request, the orchestra members arrived in full evening dress along with novelty items. One violinist wore a red clown's nose, while another, a fake gorilla's paw on his bow hand. Others were wearing funny hats and other assorted novelties. The recording was filmed for a possible 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band' television special which was ultimately abandoned. Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Mike Nesmith from The Monkees and Donovan also attended the session. https://www.thisdayinmusic.com/…/the-beatles-sgt-peppers-l…/


1972, David Bowie 


 David Bowie appeared at the Tolworth Toby Jug, London, on the opening date of his Ziggy Stardust tour playing to around 60 people in the room. The character of Ziggy was initially inspired by British rock 'n' roll singer Vince Taylor. The Ziggy Stardust tour played a total of 182 date


JANUARY 28

   

1956 - Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley (with Scotty Moore and Bill Black), made his first National Television appearance on the Dorsey brother's "Stage Show". It was the first of six appearances on the show and the first of eight performances recorded and broadcast from CBS TV in New York City. After the success of their first appearance they were signed to five more in early 1956.

1965 - The Who
The Who made their first appearance on UK TV show Ready Steady Go! To project the desired image, the hand-picked audience consisted only of teens dressed in the current Mod fashion.

 

1968 - The Doors
Jim Morrison of The Doors was arrested and charged with public drunkenness after harassing a security guard at a Las Vegas adult movie theatre.

1977 - Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd's tenth studio album Animals entered the UK charts at No.2. The sleeve concept was that of Roger Waters, who lived at the time near Clapham Common, and regularly drove past Battersea Power Station. A view of the imposing but disused former power station building was chosen for the cover image, complete with massive inflatable pig suspended between two of the towers.

1978 - Fleetwood Mac
The Fleetwood Mac album Rumours went to No.1 on the UK album chart. The groups eleventh studio album went on to sell over 45 million copies world-wide and spent over 440 weeks on the UK chart. The songs 'Go Your Own Way', 'Dreams', 'Don't Stop', and 'You Make Loving Fun' were released as singles.

 

1983 - Billy Fury

British Rock & Roll singer Billy Fury died of heart failure aged 42. An early British rock and roll (and film) star, he equalled the Beatles' record of 24 hits in the Sixties , and spent 332 weeks on the UK chart, without a chart-topping single or album. His We Want Billy (released in 1963, with The Tornados) was one of the first live albums in British rock history. Fury later played rock 'n' roller "Stormy Tempest" in the film That'll Be The Day along side David Essex and Ringo Starr.


 

1984 - Motley Crue
Backstage after a Motley Crue show in Buffalo, New York, Tommy Lee found out that his girlfriend has posed for the current issue of Penthouse magazine without his knowledge, after a fan passed comment on the pictures. Tommy punched the fan unconscious with one hit, Motleys manager Doug Thaler later convinced the fan not to press any charges.

1985 - Michael Jackson
The recording took place for We Are The World the US equivalent of Band Aid at A&M Studios in Hollywood. Written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie the all star cast included Stevie Wonder, Tina Turner, Bruce Springsteen, Diana Ross, Bob Dylan, Ray Charles, Daryl Hall, John Oates, Cyndi Lauper, Steve Perry and Bob Geldof.

1990 - Paul Abdul
Paul Abdul started a 10-week run at No.1 on the US album chart with 'Forever Your Girl'. Abdul spent sixty-four consecutive weeks on the Billboard 200 before hitting number one, making it the longest time for an album to reach the number one spot.

1968 - Sarah McLachlan

Canadian musician singer songwriter, Sarah McLachlan, who had the 1997 US No.2 album 'Surfacing'. McLachlan who has sold over 40 million albums worldwide is the organizer of the Lilith Fair US tour.

1946 - Rick Allen
Rick Allen, bassist with The Box Tops who had the 1967 US No.1 & UK No.5 single 'The Letter'.

1949 - Gene McFadden
American singer, songwriter, and record producer Gene McFadden, best known as half of the Philly soul team McFadden & Whitehead. The duo who were discovered by Otis Redding, who acted as their manager had the 1979 hit 'Ain't No Stoppin' Us Now', which sold more than 8 million copies and was nominated for a Grammy Award. McFadden died of cancer on 27 January 2006 at the age of 56.

1951 - William Nelson
William Nelson the original bassist for Funkadelic. He left the group in late 1971 after a financial dispute with George Clinton. Nelson later played with The Commodores, Chairmen of the Board, Jermaine Jackson, Lionel Richie, Smokey Robinson and The Temptations.

929 - Acker Bilk

Bernard Stanley Bilk, (Acker Bilk), bandleader who had the 1962 US No.1 & UK No.2 single 'Stranger On The Shore'. He died on 2nd Nov 2014.



 JANUARY 24

 

1933 - Zeke Carey
Zeke Carey, singer with The Flamingos. They had the 1959 US No.11 single 'I Only Have Eyes For You' which was a 1975 UK No.1 hit for Art Garfunkel. Carey died on 24th December 1999.

1941 - Aaron Neville
Aaron Neville, singer with The Neville Brothers who had the 1966 US No.2 single 'Tell It Like It Is', and the 1989 UK No.2 single with Linda Ronstadt 'Don't Know Much').

1941 - Neil Diamond
Neil Diamond, singer, songwriter. Had the 1970 US No.1 & UK No.3 single 'Cracklin' Rose' plus over 30 other US & 10 UK Top 40 singles. Wrote 'I'm A Believer', the No.1 for The Monkees. Many acts from Elvis Presley, Lulu and Deep Purple have all covered his songs. With his 2008 album ‘Home Before Dark’ Diamond became the oldest artist to have a US number one, the record was previously held by Bob Dylan in 2006 with ‘Modern Times’.

1941 - Ray Stevens
Ray Stevens, singer, songwriter who had the 1970 US No.1 & UK No.6 single 'Everything Is Beautiful' and scored the 1974 US & UK No.1 single 'The Streak'.

1947 - Warren Zevon
American singer, songwriter Warren Zevon. During the early 1970s, Zevon toured regularly with the Everly Brothers as keyboard player, band leader, and musical coordinator. During his career recorded over 15 solo albums. He is best known for his 1978 single 'Werewolves Of London' taken from his third studio album Excitable Boy. Zevon died on September 7th 2003 aged 56.

1949 - John Belushi
John Belushi, actor and singer who played Joliet 'Jake' Blues in The Blues Brothers who had the 1990 UK No.12 single 'Everybody Needs Somebody To Love'. Belushi died of a drug overdose on 5th March 1982.

  

1955 - Jools Holland
Jools Holland, English pianist, bandleader, singer, composer, who was a founding member of Squeeze who had the 1979 UK No.2 single 'Up The Junction'. Became a TV presenter on the long running UK music show The Tube and then the BBC music show Later... With Jools Holland. He also tours and releases records with the Jools Holland Big Band.
1963 - Keech Rainwater
Keech Rainwater, drummer with American country group Lonestar who had the 2000 US No.1 & UK No.21 single 'Amazed'. Lonestar has charted more than 20 singles on the Hot Country Songs chart, including 9 that reached No.1.
1974 - Christopher River Hesse
Christopher River Hesse, drummer with Hoobastank who scored the 2004 US No.2 hit 'The Reason'.
1975 - Paul Marazzi
Paul Marazzi, singer with A1 who had the 2000 UK No.1 single, 'Same Old Brand New You'.

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1953 - Eddie Fisher
Eddie Fisher was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Outside Is Heaven'. The American singer and entertainer divorced his first wife, Debbie Reynolds to marry his best friend's widow, Elizabeth Taylor, which gave him too much unwelcome publicity at the time. Eddie is father of actress Carrie Fisher who died in 2016.

1958 - The Quarry Men
The Quarry Men performed at The Cavern Club in Liverpool, (this was the bands only performance at the club). It was three years later when they appeared again at the Cavern but under their new name as The Beatles.

 

1958 - Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley was at No.1 on the UK singles chart with 'Jailhouse Rock'. It became the first ever single to enter the chart at No.1 and was Presley's second UK No.1. It went on to sell over 4 million copies in the US.

1962 - Brian Epstein
Brian Epstein signed a management deal with The Beatles. Epstein was to receive 25 per cent of the bands gross earnings, the normal management deal was 10 per cent.

 

1963 - Otto Harbach
American lyricist Otto Harbach died aged 90 in New York City. He co-wrote, 'Smoke Gets In Your Eyes', US & UK No.1 for The Platters in 1958.

1967 - Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd spent the second of three days recording the Syd Barrett songs 'Arnold Layne' and 'Candy And A Current Bun' at Sound Techniques Studios, Chelsea, London. 'Candy And A Current Bun' was first known as 'Let's Roll Another One' and contained the line 'I'm high - Don't try to spoil my fun', but it was decided that Syd Barrett should rewrite it without the drug references.

1969 - The Doors
The Doors appeared at Madison Square Garden, New York City, They were paid over $50,000 for the gig making them one of the highest paid acts this year.  

1969 - John Lennon & Yoko Ono

New Jersey state prosecutors issue a warning to US record dealers that they would be charged with distributing pornography if they were caught selling the John Lennon / Yoko Ono LP 'Two Virgins'. The front cover of the album showed the pair frontally nude, while the back cover showed them from behind. The album still managed to reach No.124 on the US, but failed to chart at all in the UK, where only 5,000 copies were ever pressed.

 1970 - James Sheppard
James Sheppard, the lead singer from the Heartbeats and Shep and the Limelites, was found murdered in his car on the Long Island Expressway. The US singer had been beaten and robbed. The Limelites reached No.2 in the US in 1961 with 'Daddy's Home'.

1970 - Led Zeppelin
Led Zeppelin appeared at Leeds University, Leeds, England. It was at this show when Zeppelin had a meeting with fine arts lecturer Zacron to discuss their ideas for the album sleeve of the band's next album, Led Zeppelin III. Zacron, born Richard Drew, had studied at Kingston College of Art with members of the Yardbirds.

1976 - Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan started a five week run at No.1 on the US chart with his 17th studio album Desire. The album features 'Hurricane', which protests the conviction of former middleweight boxer Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter for triple murder in 1966, arguing his innocence.

 

1980 - Pink Floyd

A billboard was erected on Sunset Strip, West Hollywood, California to promote Pink Floyd's new album The Wall. A blank wall was pasted up and each day a brick was ‘removed’ to slowly reveal the inside spread and title of the album.

JANUARY 22

  

1959 - Buddy Holly
Alone with an acoustic guitar and tape recorder in his New York City apartment Buddy Hollymade his last recordings, including ‘Peggy Sue Got Married’, ‘Crying, Waiting, Hoping’, ‘That's What They Say’, ‘What To Do’, ‘Learning The Game’ and ‘That Makes It Tough’. The recordings would be overdubbed posthumously and were later released by Coral Records.


 1963 - Elvis Presley recorded the song "Bossa Nova Baby." The single was released in October 1963.

1966 - The soundtrack to the Elvis Presley film "Harem Holiday" hit #11 in the U.K.

1969 - Elvis Presley recorded his single "Suspicious Minds."

 1963 - The Beatles

The Beatles appeared on three UK radio programs. First The Beatles recorded a session for the show Pop Inn at the BBC Paris studio, they then went to the Playhouse Theatre also in London, to tape a radio appearance on Saturday Club, recording five songs. Then the Beatles went back to the BBC Paris studio to record an appearance on The Talent Spot recording 'Please Please Me', 'Ask Me Why' and 'Some Other Guy' before a live audience.


 

1966 - The Beach Boys

The Beach Boys went into the studio to record 'Wouldn't It Be Nice', which would be the opening track on their forthcoming album Pet Sounds.


 

1967 - Monkees
The Monkees performed live for the very first time at The Cow Palace, San Francisco to a sell-out crowd.


1969 - The Beatles
The Beatles moved from Twickenham Film Studios to Apple studios in London to start recording the "Get Back" LP. Billy Preston was brought into the sessions (John, Paul, and George knew Preston from 1962, when he was a member of Little Richard's backing group). The Beatles were determined to record the album "live", flaws and all.


 

1970 - Bruce Springsteen
Steel Mill, (featuring Bruce Springsteen) opened for The Elvin Bishop Band at The Matrix in San Francisco, California. Steel Mill were paid only $5 for the gig, The Elvin Bishop Band received $90 as headliner.


1972 - David Bowie
David Bowie 'came out' as bisexual during an interview in the British music weekly Melody Maker.


1972 - Don McLean
Don McLean's album 'American Pie' started a seven week run at No.1 in the US album chart.


1977 - Paul McCartney

Paul McCartney went to No.1 on the US album chart with 'Wings Over America', Paul McCartney's sixth US No.1 after The Beatles.